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Startup Tips

Some tips to realize your startup idea

Entrepreneurship - A blog  ››   Startup Tips

5 blogs
  • 09 Jun 2017
    Ecommerce seems to be dead as a new business to many, except when they see startups like “Licious”- An ecommerce company providing meat at your doorstep at a press of a button.   Time is precious and Licious packages it as a value proposition along with the best quality processed meat for its premium customer.  The company was founded by Abhay Hanjura and Vivek Gupta in 2015.   Abhay and vivek loved lamb chops and fish steak, but every time they ordered those from a restaurant, they found the food lacked texture and was often insipid. They researched and found that when meat was stored between 0-5 degrees centigrade it remained fresh, but when deep-frozen for longer use, it became hard and tasteless. This led to a business plan to deliver fresh and hygienic meat at the customer's doorstep - a product curated based on the customer need.   Maths and cash flow economics is important in ensuring that you create value. “We follow Zero inventory model and have perfected the art of estimating demand with hardly any wastage. Customers can order online through our application or by calling us between 8 am- 8 pm, getting free shipping for a minimum order value of INR 300. ”, says co-founder Abhay Hanjura.   Licious raised $1 million seed funding in 2015, $3 million in Series A funding in 2016 and $10 million in Series B funding in 2017.  Scalability and delivery model have created the magic. A former finance controller at venture fund ‘Helion Advisors’ Vivek Gupta says, “Our model for every city will be one central processing centre with 8-10 delivery hubs. Larger cities may have 2-3 processing centre and 15-20 hubs”. In Bangalore they now have about 50,000 orders a month, averaging at about 1,500-1,700 per order and a customer base of about 30,000 users. Before the end of the October they are plan to reach the target at 1, 00, 000 order per month.   Swiggy, a food delivery app, has invented a new model of food delivery with delivery boys collecting paychecks at point of delivery. The model which focuses on keeping the kitchens running for the restaurants for their profitability has been received warmly by the investors when the large ecommerce players such as Snapdeal are shutting shop. Discovery of need, greater personalization and a better customer experience will define future businesses in the ecommerce. Customers will welcome those offering solutions that do not exist and experience that is similar to in store purchase. The product quality both online and offline will be the success mantra for newer players in the market. Product curation with product knowledge and expertise will be required to make it more enjoyable and all rounded experience for the customers.   Ecommerce is ultimately about presentation, execution and the math around it. If you get it right, the rest will follow. The next wave of ecommerce will be Artificial intelligence with revolutionary algorithms, optimizing experience, cost and speed of delivery. This will be a game changer and those who take the lead will be the next ecommerce giants.  
    949 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • Ecommerce seems to be dead as a new business to many, except when they see startups like “Licious”- An ecommerce company providing meat at your doorstep at a press of a button.   Time is precious and Licious packages it as a value proposition along with the best quality processed meat for its premium customer.  The company was founded by Abhay Hanjura and Vivek Gupta in 2015.   Abhay and vivek loved lamb chops and fish steak, but every time they ordered those from a restaurant, they found the food lacked texture and was often insipid. They researched and found that when meat was stored between 0-5 degrees centigrade it remained fresh, but when deep-frozen for longer use, it became hard and tasteless. This led to a business plan to deliver fresh and hygienic meat at the customer's doorstep - a product curated based on the customer need.   Maths and cash flow economics is important in ensuring that you create value. “We follow Zero inventory model and have perfected the art of estimating demand with hardly any wastage. Customers can order online through our application or by calling us between 8 am- 8 pm, getting free shipping for a minimum order value of INR 300. ”, says co-founder Abhay Hanjura.   Licious raised $1 million seed funding in 2015, $3 million in Series A funding in 2016 and $10 million in Series B funding in 2017.  Scalability and delivery model have created the magic. A former finance controller at venture fund ‘Helion Advisors’ Vivek Gupta says, “Our model for every city will be one central processing centre with 8-10 delivery hubs. Larger cities may have 2-3 processing centre and 15-20 hubs”. In Bangalore they now have about 50,000 orders a month, averaging at about 1,500-1,700 per order and a customer base of about 30,000 users. Before the end of the October they are plan to reach the target at 1, 00, 000 order per month.   Swiggy, a food delivery app, has invented a new model of food delivery with delivery boys collecting paychecks at point of delivery. The model which focuses on keeping the kitchens running for the restaurants for their profitability has been received warmly by the investors when the large ecommerce players such as Snapdeal are shutting shop. Discovery of need, greater personalization and a better customer experience will define future businesses in the ecommerce. Customers will welcome those offering solutions that do not exist and experience that is similar to in store purchase. The product quality both online and offline will be the success mantra for newer players in the market. Product curation with product knowledge and expertise will be required to make it more enjoyable and all rounded experience for the customers.   Ecommerce is ultimately about presentation, execution and the math around it. If you get it right, the rest will follow. The next wave of ecommerce will be Artificial intelligence with revolutionary algorithms, optimizing experience, cost and speed of delivery. This will be a game changer and those who take the lead will be the next ecommerce giants.  
    Jun 09, 2017 949
  • 13 Dec 2016
    On 16th Jan 2016, Prime Minister Narendra Modi kick-started the ‘Startup India, Standup India Campaign’ with the intention of building a strong ecosystem for nurturing innovation, driving sustainable economic growth and generating employment. Prime initiatives taken by the government are focused on reducing regulatory burdens, funding, Industry-Academia partnership and incubation.   Start Ups now have access to Single Window Clearance and 10,000 crore fund of funds under the program. There is  No Capital Gains tax and Income tax applicable for three years and special schemes have been announced for women entrepreneurs. RBI has proposed relaxations enabling start-ups to receive foreign venture capital investment by permitting Foreign Venture Capital Investors to transfer shares to other residents or non-residents. Start-up India Hub has been created to foster mentoring for start-ups and to help them in obtaining funds and advice. The government also launched Mudra Bank in April 2015 to boost the growth of small businesses and manufacturing units. The new Bank provides a credit facility of up to INR 50,000 to small businesses. NASSCOM has started a program called 10000 startups in association with the industry and aims to facilitate and incubate Start Ups.       The government is doing its part, the world considers India as a hot investment destination and angels and VCs are in line, looking for bright ideas in the market that has more growth potential than any other across the world. Softbank has invested US$2 billion into Indian startups. The Japanese firm has pledged the total investments at US$10 billion. Oracle announced to set up nine incubation centers in Bangalore, Chennai, Gurgaon, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Noida, Pune, Trivandrum and Vijayawada. Many other corporate and MNC's have announced several other funding and incubation programs. This is a big boost to the entrepreneurial and start up machinery in the country.     "Is there one invention from India that has become a household name in the globe? Is there one technology that has transformed the productivity of global corporations? Is there one idea that has lead to an earth shaking invention to delight global citizens?," asked NR Narayana Murthy, chairman emeritus of Infosys, while addressing the second annual convocation of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru. "...the reality is that there is no such contribution from India in the past 60 years," he said, answering his own question.         Wake up India, it is the time to innovate and launch your ideas. Never before has the time been more ripe to do something of your own. Education, bureaucracy, money and infrastructure is no more an excuse to not to unleash your creativity. Make use of the favorable regime and investment environment, realize your ideas and turn them into giants that are not only revered and followed, but also set examples for other developing nations across the world.    
    860 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • On 16th Jan 2016, Prime Minister Narendra Modi kick-started the ‘Startup India, Standup India Campaign’ with the intention of building a strong ecosystem for nurturing innovation, driving sustainable economic growth and generating employment. Prime initiatives taken by the government are focused on reducing regulatory burdens, funding, Industry-Academia partnership and incubation.   Start Ups now have access to Single Window Clearance and 10,000 crore fund of funds under the program. There is  No Capital Gains tax and Income tax applicable for three years and special schemes have been announced for women entrepreneurs. RBI has proposed relaxations enabling start-ups to receive foreign venture capital investment by permitting Foreign Venture Capital Investors to transfer shares to other residents or non-residents. Start-up India Hub has been created to foster mentoring for start-ups and to help them in obtaining funds and advice. The government also launched Mudra Bank in April 2015 to boost the growth of small businesses and manufacturing units. The new Bank provides a credit facility of up to INR 50,000 to small businesses. NASSCOM has started a program called 10000 startups in association with the industry and aims to facilitate and incubate Start Ups.       The government is doing its part, the world considers India as a hot investment destination and angels and VCs are in line, looking for bright ideas in the market that has more growth potential than any other across the world. Softbank has invested US$2 billion into Indian startups. The Japanese firm has pledged the total investments at US$10 billion. Oracle announced to set up nine incubation centers in Bangalore, Chennai, Gurgaon, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Noida, Pune, Trivandrum and Vijayawada. Many other corporate and MNC's have announced several other funding and incubation programs. This is a big boost to the entrepreneurial and start up machinery in the country.     "Is there one invention from India that has become a household name in the globe? Is there one technology that has transformed the productivity of global corporations? Is there one idea that has lead to an earth shaking invention to delight global citizens?," asked NR Narayana Murthy, chairman emeritus of Infosys, while addressing the second annual convocation of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru. "...the reality is that there is no such contribution from India in the past 60 years," he said, answering his own question.         Wake up India, it is the time to innovate and launch your ideas. Never before has the time been more ripe to do something of your own. Education, bureaucracy, money and infrastructure is no more an excuse to not to unleash your creativity. Make use of the favorable regime and investment environment, realize your ideas and turn them into giants that are not only revered and followed, but also set examples for other developing nations across the world.    
    Dec 13, 2016 860
  • 12 Dec 2016
    To succeed with your idea, it is important to work on the problems currently faced by a group of people. It ensures that the problem really exists. It sounds obvious to say that business ideas should only work on problems that exist. however, most common mistakes entrepreneurs make is to solve problems that don't exist.   Why so many start up venture into something that no one wants ? Because they are merely looking at doing something different, without gauging the potential of their idea. When we run our ideas with our friends they don't say they won't use the byproduct, but you get a response that it sounds great and they may potentially use it at some point tomorrow. However, after you launch, you have zero users.   When an idea launches, there have to be at least some users who really need what the byproduct is, not just potential users, but those who want it urgently. Usually this group of idea users is small, because if there was something that a large number of people urgently needed, it would already exist.   Enterprising people often hold back their start-up ideas as they fear that their ideas may be copied or ridiculed, instead of calculating the potential of the idea by exposing it to a community or group of people, who may become  potential users of the byproduct of that idea. Entrepreneurs have to move out to find this group of users and litmus test their innovation before investing time and money.   How do you tell whether there's a path out of your idea? How do you ascertain whether something has the potential of a next Google, Apple or Facebook, or it is just a niche product that may or may not succeed?   Most successful founders don't even realize at first how big a market they are targeting. They grow while exploring their idea and change their business model into something that appeals to a group of people who need their byproducts urgently. This is entrepreneurship.       Sharing ideas on a dedicated platform such as Idea Center on bornbrio.com will help you  get neutral reactions from those who don't worry much about the relationship, but consider the usability based on their actual needs. It is a litmus test for the success of your idea. You could potentially have a demand created even before you launch the final product. For sure you can get loads of suggestions that can be filtered to create a much more refined product.   History testifies that people have indeed copied  ideas, however, not before those ridiculed ideas proved themselves for those who  replicated them. For example, Ola  copied Uber’s successful business model after Uber was valued in billions of dollars and e-commerce marketplace player, Flipkart expects government to provide protection to counter the leader -Amazon in its eCommerce business. Neither Uber nor Amazon made any efforts to wrap their ideas and make them confidential, but they went on to try them by talking about them.   Groundbreaking ideas can rarely be copied before they become a reality, because they are different and need skills and in-depth thought process unique to the individual who successfully grooms the idea into successful business. More often than not, potential ideas die their death, due to lack of knowledge and skills to execute them.  In other cases the idea simply seems too attractive for the individual who thinks it, but is unable to gather the momentum in terms of the users of the byproduct of that idea.   Sharing your idea motivates you to work further on your half-baked ideas when people question, appreciate and inspire you.  You can get a co-founder, who shares your vision. You will also have access to mentors who will guide you on your way forward and  the investors who may be willing  to bet on your idea.   Testify your ideas and gather the groups of users who need its byproduct urgently. That's the sole mantra for success. You can do it by keeping everything confidential and investing in each of your idea, before most of them are proved worthless, simply because there are no users for your niche or you can start today and publish whatever comes to your mind and select those who appeal to a group of users.   Think what would happen if all of the startups in Silicon Valley suddenly stopped talking to each other? The answer is predictable: deal flows, partnerships and innovation would stop. The time that an idea takes towards becoming the next giant will only go up multi-fold and many ideas which get ridiculed, would  not even see the light of the day.   Go on and share your thoughts on Idea Center at www.bornbrio.com. Realize the next big venture with the Innovators, the group, who needs your products.    
    1394 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • To succeed with your idea, it is important to work on the problems currently faced by a group of people. It ensures that the problem really exists. It sounds obvious to say that business ideas should only work on problems that exist. however, most common mistakes entrepreneurs make is to solve problems that don't exist.   Why so many start up venture into something that no one wants ? Because they are merely looking at doing something different, without gauging the potential of their idea. When we run our ideas with our friends they don't say they won't use the byproduct, but you get a response that it sounds great and they may potentially use it at some point tomorrow. However, after you launch, you have zero users.   When an idea launches, there have to be at least some users who really need what the byproduct is, not just potential users, but those who want it urgently. Usually this group of idea users is small, because if there was something that a large number of people urgently needed, it would already exist.   Enterprising people often hold back their start-up ideas as they fear that their ideas may be copied or ridiculed, instead of calculating the potential of the idea by exposing it to a community or group of people, who may become  potential users of the byproduct of that idea. Entrepreneurs have to move out to find this group of users and litmus test their innovation before investing time and money.   How do you tell whether there's a path out of your idea? How do you ascertain whether something has the potential of a next Google, Apple or Facebook, or it is just a niche product that may or may not succeed?   Most successful founders don't even realize at first how big a market they are targeting. They grow while exploring their idea and change their business model into something that appeals to a group of people who need their byproducts urgently. This is entrepreneurship.       Sharing ideas on a dedicated platform such as Idea Center on bornbrio.com will help you  get neutral reactions from those who don't worry much about the relationship, but consider the usability based on their actual needs. It is a litmus test for the success of your idea. You could potentially have a demand created even before you launch the final product. For sure you can get loads of suggestions that can be filtered to create a much more refined product.   History testifies that people have indeed copied  ideas, however, not before those ridiculed ideas proved themselves for those who  replicated them. For example, Ola  copied Uber’s successful business model after Uber was valued in billions of dollars and e-commerce marketplace player, Flipkart expects government to provide protection to counter the leader -Amazon in its eCommerce business. Neither Uber nor Amazon made any efforts to wrap their ideas and make them confidential, but they went on to try them by talking about them.   Groundbreaking ideas can rarely be copied before they become a reality, because they are different and need skills and in-depth thought process unique to the individual who successfully grooms the idea into successful business. More often than not, potential ideas die their death, due to lack of knowledge and skills to execute them.  In other cases the idea simply seems too attractive for the individual who thinks it, but is unable to gather the momentum in terms of the users of the byproduct of that idea.   Sharing your idea motivates you to work further on your half-baked ideas when people question, appreciate and inspire you.  You can get a co-founder, who shares your vision. You will also have access to mentors who will guide you on your way forward and  the investors who may be willing  to bet on your idea.   Testify your ideas and gather the groups of users who need its byproduct urgently. That's the sole mantra for success. You can do it by keeping everything confidential and investing in each of your idea, before most of them are proved worthless, simply because there are no users for your niche or you can start today and publish whatever comes to your mind and select those who appeal to a group of users.   Think what would happen if all of the startups in Silicon Valley suddenly stopped talking to each other? The answer is predictable: deal flows, partnerships and innovation would stop. The time that an idea takes towards becoming the next giant will only go up multi-fold and many ideas which get ridiculed, would  not even see the light of the day.   Go on and share your thoughts on Idea Center at www.bornbrio.com. Realize the next big venture with the Innovators, the group, who needs your products.    
    Dec 12, 2016 1394
  • 27 May 2016
    Sort it out: Will India produce a Google? Or should we say, can India do so? The operative part also includes, when? Repeat. Sort it out. Will we ever, can we, and if so, when? If India’s going to take say 20 years, our US counterparts will be quite possibly 20 times ahead of the game. In other words, status quo, even if we can – and that’s assuming even a better case scenario. Sorry for sour grapes.   To begin from the beginning, India is on the right path, AND rightly sloganeering (slogan baazi  in desi lingo), Yes We Can a la Obama. Truth to tell, there has been a lot of hectic strategizing and Excel Sheet data crunching to create a business-friendly climate in terms of regulations and putting in place an enabling VC funding architecture. The Modi era’s energy, enthusiasm and enterprise is indeed refreshing and not found wanting, even by some of its harsh critics. The international community and the world’s best markers of global economy, like the World Bank, IMF, Goldman Sachs, et al are batting for India’s recognized potential in harvesting the world’s largest eco-system of startups.   But far away from the glitz and glam of the high octane power clubs and boardrooms, on the byzantine by-lanes of India’s sprawling bazaars, you see the only change that has come upon them is them ad-libbing power phrases, viz. Startup India, Standup India, SIDBI Startup Mitra, Skilled India, Digital India to name a few that catch the eye.   It is true that the latest amendment to the Companies Act facilitates registration of a firm in a day. It is also true that the Mudra Bank initiative can be a revolutionary way of empowering, enabling and fostering the startup culture by making cheap and easy credit with no collateral. The Sidbi Startup Mitra through its online platform connects entrepreneurs in the start-up community with angel investors, venture capital funds, incubators, and the like.   Nice. But for the reality check. Pradeep chucked a MNC job because it was reducing him to be a coolie (doing the same thing, mindless stuff) and was keen on joining an innovative startup. His family and his community was livid. Going from a MNC to a startup is like preferring a sip of desi HPMC grape juice over a shot of Pinot Gigrio wine. This is one example from the trenches to show the mirror to the face for all the over-enthusiastic policy hawks (granted that their arguments are not entirely unmerited) who do not place the same value to the implementation template as they give to the ‘what’s-the-good-word presentations’.   The bottom-line: We are still waiting to hear that What You Get is What You See in India. A back-of-the-envelope business gyan from India’s buzzing bazaars is a) connections b) confusion c) a lack of convergence between policy and delivery.   The architecture is in place, but the foundation is still creaking, the walls are forbidding, the doors close and do not open, and instead of a fresh breathe of air, you get the same old stale polluted air. If only intent were enough, we wouldn’t see India’s brightest young entrepreneurs winging away to Silicon Valley where they have and continue to make enough wealth to keep the pot burning for generations to come.   By the way, Wake up India, is quite a good slogan, what? Let’s sincerely hope it will not be like waiting for Godot…
    422 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • Sort it out: Will India produce a Google? Or should we say, can India do so? The operative part also includes, when? Repeat. Sort it out. Will we ever, can we, and if so, when? If India’s going to take say 20 years, our US counterparts will be quite possibly 20 times ahead of the game. In other words, status quo, even if we can – and that’s assuming even a better case scenario. Sorry for sour grapes.   To begin from the beginning, India is on the right path, AND rightly sloganeering (slogan baazi  in desi lingo), Yes We Can a la Obama. Truth to tell, there has been a lot of hectic strategizing and Excel Sheet data crunching to create a business-friendly climate in terms of regulations and putting in place an enabling VC funding architecture. The Modi era’s energy, enthusiasm and enterprise is indeed refreshing and not found wanting, even by some of its harsh critics. The international community and the world’s best markers of global economy, like the World Bank, IMF, Goldman Sachs, et al are batting for India’s recognized potential in harvesting the world’s largest eco-system of startups.   But far away from the glitz and glam of the high octane power clubs and boardrooms, on the byzantine by-lanes of India’s sprawling bazaars, you see the only change that has come upon them is them ad-libbing power phrases, viz. Startup India, Standup India, SIDBI Startup Mitra, Skilled India, Digital India to name a few that catch the eye.   It is true that the latest amendment to the Companies Act facilitates registration of a firm in a day. It is also true that the Mudra Bank initiative can be a revolutionary way of empowering, enabling and fostering the startup culture by making cheap and easy credit with no collateral. The Sidbi Startup Mitra through its online platform connects entrepreneurs in the start-up community with angel investors, venture capital funds, incubators, and the like.   Nice. But for the reality check. Pradeep chucked a MNC job because it was reducing him to be a coolie (doing the same thing, mindless stuff) and was keen on joining an innovative startup. His family and his community was livid. Going from a MNC to a startup is like preferring a sip of desi HPMC grape juice over a shot of Pinot Gigrio wine. This is one example from the trenches to show the mirror to the face for all the over-enthusiastic policy hawks (granted that their arguments are not entirely unmerited) who do not place the same value to the implementation template as they give to the ‘what’s-the-good-word presentations’.   The bottom-line: We are still waiting to hear that What You Get is What You See in India. A back-of-the-envelope business gyan from India’s buzzing bazaars is a) connections b) confusion c) a lack of convergence between policy and delivery.   The architecture is in place, but the foundation is still creaking, the walls are forbidding, the doors close and do not open, and instead of a fresh breathe of air, you get the same old stale polluted air. If only intent were enough, we wouldn’t see India’s brightest young entrepreneurs winging away to Silicon Valley where they have and continue to make enough wealth to keep the pot burning for generations to come.   By the way, Wake up India, is quite a good slogan, what? Let’s sincerely hope it will not be like waiting for Godot…
    May 27, 2016 422
  • 27 May 2016
    Defining luxury for our times is like decoding the colors of a chameleon. Just when you think you have figured it out, you realize somewhat sheepishly that you have missed the wood for the trees.   Let’s make a gallant try anyways. For a business tycoon who probably has to schedule even his time to the loo, luxury is to simply do nothing literally, melting away the moments like a cow contemplating on the roadside. For Hollywood diva Kate Winslet real luxury – which she says she has – is having the time to read endless stories in bed with her kids. And closer at home in Bollywood, luxury for the King Khans could be access to normal open spaces like normal people, with no pesky paparazzi or fussy fans. If you are a 14-hour a workday techie, luxury could be a day with no meetings, no appointments, no schedules, and no project deadlines. For the ordinary man on the street waging a daily battle to live another day, luxury is having enough money to take off a day or two. For marketers in FMCG sector, fashion and lifestyle industry, peddling luxury is their bread and butter, and winning it is their jam. For style divas, art house connoisseurs and designers, luxury forms the core of their value eco-system. In cricketing terms, luxury for a number 11 batsman is the gift of a no ball from a bowler bowling the last ball of a match with one run to win. For the philosophical, luxury is a state of mind.   In short, luxury is no one-size-fits-all. It’s more of a to-each-his/her-own.   Despite being so, we can still get a grip on what luxury constitutes. Today, the world has evolved from the time when luxury was primarily a function of money to becoming a function of comfort. This could arguably be dismissed as a simplistic analysis among conservative circles, but the now world of the new age is certainly no respecter of fossilized data points.   Remember the 20:80 principle which says that 20% of the products brings in 80% of the revenues for a company? We can draw a similar parallel. Today, we can say that only 20% of people believe luxury is driven by money per se. The corollary is that for 80% of the people luxury could well be defined by comfort and ease of use.   In the age of smart phones which are available in the market anywhere, anyplace, anytime for less than US$30-50, smart people equate luxury with comfort – more so, among those who live in the bottom of the pyramid, which constitutes, easily 80% of the global populace. And that’s where the rules of luxury are being rewritten, and the boundaries redrawn.   The world is getting so disruptive that luxury as it was understood before as the exclusive preserve of the privileged, has now become more secular and inclusive, so much so that the idea of mixing high-brow luxury with low-brow mass-market fashion is no more considered as an oxymoron.   In short, luxury is today democratized. It enjoys a more level playing field than at any time in history. That’s one color even the chameleon will not change. So maybe we can call it Luxury Version Now.0.
    308 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • Defining luxury for our times is like decoding the colors of a chameleon. Just when you think you have figured it out, you realize somewhat sheepishly that you have missed the wood for the trees.   Let’s make a gallant try anyways. For a business tycoon who probably has to schedule even his time to the loo, luxury is to simply do nothing literally, melting away the moments like a cow contemplating on the roadside. For Hollywood diva Kate Winslet real luxury – which she says she has – is having the time to read endless stories in bed with her kids. And closer at home in Bollywood, luxury for the King Khans could be access to normal open spaces like normal people, with no pesky paparazzi or fussy fans. If you are a 14-hour a workday techie, luxury could be a day with no meetings, no appointments, no schedules, and no project deadlines. For the ordinary man on the street waging a daily battle to live another day, luxury is having enough money to take off a day or two. For marketers in FMCG sector, fashion and lifestyle industry, peddling luxury is their bread and butter, and winning it is their jam. For style divas, art house connoisseurs and designers, luxury forms the core of their value eco-system. In cricketing terms, luxury for a number 11 batsman is the gift of a no ball from a bowler bowling the last ball of a match with one run to win. For the philosophical, luxury is a state of mind.   In short, luxury is no one-size-fits-all. It’s more of a to-each-his/her-own.   Despite being so, we can still get a grip on what luxury constitutes. Today, the world has evolved from the time when luxury was primarily a function of money to becoming a function of comfort. This could arguably be dismissed as a simplistic analysis among conservative circles, but the now world of the new age is certainly no respecter of fossilized data points.   Remember the 20:80 principle which says that 20% of the products brings in 80% of the revenues for a company? We can draw a similar parallel. Today, we can say that only 20% of people believe luxury is driven by money per se. The corollary is that for 80% of the people luxury could well be defined by comfort and ease of use.   In the age of smart phones which are available in the market anywhere, anyplace, anytime for less than US$30-50, smart people equate luxury with comfort – more so, among those who live in the bottom of the pyramid, which constitutes, easily 80% of the global populace. And that’s where the rules of luxury are being rewritten, and the boundaries redrawn.   The world is getting so disruptive that luxury as it was understood before as the exclusive preserve of the privileged, has now become more secular and inclusive, so much so that the idea of mixing high-brow luxury with low-brow mass-market fashion is no more considered as an oxymoron.   In short, luxury is today democratized. It enjoys a more level playing field than at any time in history. That’s one color even the chameleon will not change. So maybe we can call it Luxury Version Now.0.
    May 27, 2016 308