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Job Market

Job creation is possibly one of the biggest achievement of the startups

Entrepreneurship - A blog  ››   Job Market

2 blogs
  • 10 Jul 2017
    Being home for four months on vacation, I had a lot of time on my hand and not a lot of work. After putting in some thought, I decided that doing an internship would be the best use of my time. Thus started the process of applying for internships, on various platforms, over the next week. Having applied to jobs that I deemed a good fit for me, all I had to now do was wait for the acceptances and the interviews to come around. Within the next few days I was accepted to over 10 companies and now I had the privilege to be able to choose from them.   Companies ranged from MNCs worth millions of dollars, to startups that weren’t even a month old. I now had to choose what kind of company I wanted to work in, and I chose to work for a startup. The reason for this was simple, as supposedly you learn more while working for startups.   I think I am now in the perfect position to judge this statement for a fact, having worked in a startup for the past one month. I would like to share in this article my thoughts, both good and bad, about working in a startup.   I would first like to address the elephant in the room, the fact that you learn more when you work for a startup. Never having worked for a well-established corporation, I am not in a position to comment on the experience of working in one. However, I can comment on the experience of working in startup. Being an Economics and Mathematics student, I thought I would be involved in the finance side of things. Boy, was I in for a surprise. Over the past one month I worked on subjects ranging from marketing to business research. Frankly, working in a startup is not for someone who does not like to learn and experience new things. In addition to the core subject you have expertise in, you would be required to work on a plethora of things. You might be asked to make calls to clients, pitch ideas to investors and so on and so forth. While to the common man this might seem like a waste of time, the experience which you gain from doing all these tasks is invaluable. You learn to communicate with people under pressure while making sure you have all your facts right. I don’t know about you, but as an eighteen-year-old, I can only be thankful for such an experience.   Everyone knows that work is all the more bearable when you work with people you can talk to, and maybe even be friends with. Startups usually have a work force that ranges from anywhere between five to fifty people and this means that employees know each other by name. Being on first-name basis with everyone in the office makes the job so much easier, as you can cooperate with each other on those extensive projects, or call in when you might be late for work so that your colleagues can cover up for you. All in all, knowing your colleagues is awesome and makes work fun.   On a similar note, one of the biggest advantages of working in a startup is the fact that you get to interact with everyone in the office. I have personally worked with the CEO of the startup I work in, and it is truly an enriching experience. Learning, first-hand from a person who has approximately twenty years of experience in the field, is something that cannot be underestimated. In a MNC you will rarely interact with the manager and that too for only a couple of minutes at a time. Working with someone who has so much to offer is lucrative to almost everyone.   One of the reasons why I settled in so quickly within the organization is the fact that there is no age barrier. Your position in the organization is directly related to the amount of work you do and the quality of your work. You can be the youngest member on the team, but you will receive a certain status based solely on your aptitude and contribution. This should be encouraging for everyone out there who has suffered due to office politics of any kind.   The only drawback with my experience of working in a startup was the brand name. When you tell someone you’re working in startup that they probably haven’t heard of, more often than not, you won’t receive the same reaction as that of working in an established corporation.   However, the choice you have to make is whether you want to be surrounded in a place full of energy, motivation and innovation, where you have a chance to drastically improve your skillset. Or do you want to be one of the innumerable men, who work 9 to 5 and do the same task over and over? The choice is yours, but when you want to experience something new, know that startups don’t judge based on age.    
    553 Posted by Ruhaan Dev Tyagi
  • Being home for four months on vacation, I had a lot of time on my hand and not a lot of work. After putting in some thought, I decided that doing an internship would be the best use of my time. Thus started the process of applying for internships, on various platforms, over the next week. Having applied to jobs that I deemed a good fit for me, all I had to now do was wait for the acceptances and the interviews to come around. Within the next few days I was accepted to over 10 companies and now I had the privilege to be able to choose from them.   Companies ranged from MNCs worth millions of dollars, to startups that weren’t even a month old. I now had to choose what kind of company I wanted to work in, and I chose to work for a startup. The reason for this was simple, as supposedly you learn more while working for startups.   I think I am now in the perfect position to judge this statement for a fact, having worked in a startup for the past one month. I would like to share in this article my thoughts, both good and bad, about working in a startup.   I would first like to address the elephant in the room, the fact that you learn more when you work for a startup. Never having worked for a well-established corporation, I am not in a position to comment on the experience of working in one. However, I can comment on the experience of working in startup. Being an Economics and Mathematics student, I thought I would be involved in the finance side of things. Boy, was I in for a surprise. Over the past one month I worked on subjects ranging from marketing to business research. Frankly, working in a startup is not for someone who does not like to learn and experience new things. In addition to the core subject you have expertise in, you would be required to work on a plethora of things. You might be asked to make calls to clients, pitch ideas to investors and so on and so forth. While to the common man this might seem like a waste of time, the experience which you gain from doing all these tasks is invaluable. You learn to communicate with people under pressure while making sure you have all your facts right. I don’t know about you, but as an eighteen-year-old, I can only be thankful for such an experience.   Everyone knows that work is all the more bearable when you work with people you can talk to, and maybe even be friends with. Startups usually have a work force that ranges from anywhere between five to fifty people and this means that employees know each other by name. Being on first-name basis with everyone in the office makes the job so much easier, as you can cooperate with each other on those extensive projects, or call in when you might be late for work so that your colleagues can cover up for you. All in all, knowing your colleagues is awesome and makes work fun.   On a similar note, one of the biggest advantages of working in a startup is the fact that you get to interact with everyone in the office. I have personally worked with the CEO of the startup I work in, and it is truly an enriching experience. Learning, first-hand from a person who has approximately twenty years of experience in the field, is something that cannot be underestimated. In a MNC you will rarely interact with the manager and that too for only a couple of minutes at a time. Working with someone who has so much to offer is lucrative to almost everyone.   One of the reasons why I settled in so quickly within the organization is the fact that there is no age barrier. Your position in the organization is directly related to the amount of work you do and the quality of your work. You can be the youngest member on the team, but you will receive a certain status based solely on your aptitude and contribution. This should be encouraging for everyone out there who has suffered due to office politics of any kind.   The only drawback with my experience of working in a startup was the brand name. When you tell someone you’re working in startup that they probably haven’t heard of, more often than not, you won’t receive the same reaction as that of working in an established corporation.   However, the choice you have to make is whether you want to be surrounded in a place full of energy, motivation and innovation, where you have a chance to drastically improve your skillset. Or do you want to be one of the innumerable men, who work 9 to 5 and do the same task over and over? The choice is yours, but when you want to experience something new, know that startups don’t judge based on age.    
    Jul 10, 2017 553
  • 27 May 2016
    Take a dipstick poll, anytime, anyplace, anywhere, anytime in India about the most preferred professions by the youth and no prizes for guessing the answer will be: Engineers and Doctors. For the world’s largest middle class in particular, it is the default mode of choice almost by rote.   If the demand is driven by a herd mentality, supply side economics, viz. supply creates its own demand, drives the mushrooming of engineering and medical colleges across the nook and corner of the country, distorting the pursuit of education as commerce.    Simple economics will tell you that when demand and supply are on a high upward path, it leads to a bubble in the market. But this bubble does not burst; it permeates into other sectors creating inefficiencies in the system.   Example: An electrical engineer takes up a job as a bank teller. A qualified MBBS starts a pre-nursery. Moral of the story: We have ended up institutionalizing intentionally or otherwise, the system of a square peg in a round hole.   Consider the devastating implications of such a mismatch in the pursuit of your study and vocation you choose. You end up eroding the quality of engineers and doctors who stick to their line of expertise, and also dry up alternative needs of society, such as say, politicians, economists and leaders.   The facts are startling: As many as 15 lac engineers enter the job market annually in our country. There are 6,214 engineering and technology institutions with 2.9 million students enrolled in them, according to the Ministry of Human Resource Development. It is more than likely that the actual figures could be higher if you consider that there are many colleges that are not registered. According to yet another study an overwhelming majority, that is, 97% of engineering grads are not fluent in spoken English!   Now juxtapose this with developed countries like the US (2.38 lac), Russia (4.54 lac) and Japan (1.68 lac) and it will be a lightning-hit-the-key moment. Flip it the other way and you can say that India whose economy is over eight times lesser than the US economy produces nearly eight times more engineers than it!   Now, can we blame the decay in politics and policy making, when we push our youngsters to professions that have passed their box-office date, in colleges that are run as education mills, without giving a thought to other productive, respectable, profitable and fulfilling pursuits like becoming thought leaders, economists, and politicians.   It is very easy to be contemptuous of politics and administration, but it need not be only a cesspool of corruption. You can be honest and legitimate and yet make a living far better living that of an average doctor or an engineer – without muddying yourself in tainted money. An entry level elected representative say a Corporator or a MLA earns anywhere between Rs 1 lac to Rs 2 lac (and upwards too) taking all allowances into account – which is far more than you could earn as a doctor or an engineer. Even an economist can earn a cushy income as a policy wonk or an analyst.   The problem unfortunately lies with the parents who more often than not decide their ward’s future. We have to stop realizing our dreams on our children. Otherwise, let us wait for another few years and the inexorable and invisible hand of the market will “engineer” and “doctor” the death knell on these two most sought after professions.
    299 Posted by Expert Advisor
  • Take a dipstick poll, anytime, anyplace, anywhere, anytime in India about the most preferred professions by the youth and no prizes for guessing the answer will be: Engineers and Doctors. For the world’s largest middle class in particular, it is the default mode of choice almost by rote.   If the demand is driven by a herd mentality, supply side economics, viz. supply creates its own demand, drives the mushrooming of engineering and medical colleges across the nook and corner of the country, distorting the pursuit of education as commerce.    Simple economics will tell you that when demand and supply are on a high upward path, it leads to a bubble in the market. But this bubble does not burst; it permeates into other sectors creating inefficiencies in the system.   Example: An electrical engineer takes up a job as a bank teller. A qualified MBBS starts a pre-nursery. Moral of the story: We have ended up institutionalizing intentionally or otherwise, the system of a square peg in a round hole.   Consider the devastating implications of such a mismatch in the pursuit of your study and vocation you choose. You end up eroding the quality of engineers and doctors who stick to their line of expertise, and also dry up alternative needs of society, such as say, politicians, economists and leaders.   The facts are startling: As many as 15 lac engineers enter the job market annually in our country. There are 6,214 engineering and technology institutions with 2.9 million students enrolled in them, according to the Ministry of Human Resource Development. It is more than likely that the actual figures could be higher if you consider that there are many colleges that are not registered. According to yet another study an overwhelming majority, that is, 97% of engineering grads are not fluent in spoken English!   Now juxtapose this with developed countries like the US (2.38 lac), Russia (4.54 lac) and Japan (1.68 lac) and it will be a lightning-hit-the-key moment. Flip it the other way and you can say that India whose economy is over eight times lesser than the US economy produces nearly eight times more engineers than it!   Now, can we blame the decay in politics and policy making, when we push our youngsters to professions that have passed their box-office date, in colleges that are run as education mills, without giving a thought to other productive, respectable, profitable and fulfilling pursuits like becoming thought leaders, economists, and politicians.   It is very easy to be contemptuous of politics and administration, but it need not be only a cesspool of corruption. You can be honest and legitimate and yet make a living far better living that of an average doctor or an engineer – without muddying yourself in tainted money. An entry level elected representative say a Corporator or a MLA earns anywhere between Rs 1 lac to Rs 2 lac (and upwards too) taking all allowances into account – which is far more than you could earn as a doctor or an engineer. Even an economist can earn a cushy income as a policy wonk or an analyst.   The problem unfortunately lies with the parents who more often than not decide their ward’s future. We have to stop realizing our dreams on our children. Otherwise, let us wait for another few years and the inexorable and invisible hand of the market will “engineer” and “doctor” the death knell on these two most sought after professions.
    May 27, 2016 299